Vivian_Walworth_early_shot-Colorized.jpg
2010 Vivian Walworth portrait_NSA_Huron_
Interview by Mindy Levine Ph.D.
2003 Vivian Walworth looking at the Vect
2003 Vivian Walworth looking at the Vectograph exhibit at Museum of Jurassic Technology in Culver City, CA by Susan Pinsky
2002 Susan Pinsky Vectograph collection at home with
1945 color vectograms made by Vivian Walworth Nov
by Susan Pinsky 

It is a hot July afternoon when I pull up to a red brick building in North Cambridge, which houses StereoJet, Incorporated. Upon entering the building, I find the president and chief technical officer of the start-up company, Vivian Walworth, running an experiment at the bench. Vivian, who will turn 90 next January, explained that the self-funded start-up company is making three-dimensional polarizing images with dichroic dyes. On that day, Vivian had been working on a "tricky solution" en route to the inkjet printing of a color image with these dyes.


Vivian's interest in science started at a young age, when she was a student at Cass Technical High School in Detroit. This magnet school, which still exists today, places a strong emphasis on math and science education. At that school, Vivian first learned chemistry from a "marvelous chemistry teacher," Evangeline Lodge Lindbergh, who had studied chemistry at the University of Michigan and was, incidentally, the mother of the famous Charles Lindbergh.


The high school had a Chemistry Club to encourage extra-curricular activities related to science. When Vivian found out that girls were not allowed to join the club, she formed her own Girls' Science Club. The Girls' Science Club enjoyed a variety of activities, including site tours of chemical manufacturing companies and a lab visit with the distinguished (and first female head of a division of the American Chemical Society) Dr. Icie Macy Hoobler. Overall, the girls' club had a "much better program than the boys' chemistry club," said Vivian. "We were really something."

2010 Vivian Walworth at the National Stereoscopic Assn. convention in Huron OH by David Starkman
Sally, David Burder, Susan Pinsky, Sam K
1997 Boston, MA Sally, David Burder, Susan Pinsky, Sam Kitrosser,
Vivian Walworth and David Starkman 
2002 Dec Vectograph exhibit display of e
2002 Vectograph exhibit display of eye test at Museum of Jurussic Technology Dec by Susan Pinsky
2002 Vivian Walworth visits John Sexton ©2002 Anne Larsen. 

After high school Vivian continued her chemistry education at the University of Michigan, which she attended on a full-tuition scholarship. During her time there, Vivian worked for the noted analytical chemist Dr. H. H. Willard, doing both laboratory research and secretarial work.

 

Additionally, the shortage of graduate researchers (due to World War II), gave Vivian the opportunity to work as an undergraduate laboratory instructor. At the end of her junior year she married Wilbur Walworth, who had just graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering. He then took an engineering job at the Ritter Dental Company in Rochester, New York.


During her senior year, Vivian had an excellent on-campus interview with a visiting recruiter from Kodak. Following her graduation, she moved to Rochester and arrived at Kodak for a follow-up interview, only to be offered a secretarial job. "You must have an excellent vocabulary," she was told. In response, "I left in a huff," said Vivian. 

1997%20Boston%20MA%20breakfast%2024%20Ma
1997 Boston MA breakfast 24 May David Burder, Sally, Reuben Hoppestein, Vivian Walworth,
David Starkman and others by Susan Pinsky 
2010_NSA_Huron_OH_Susan Pinsky and Vivia
2010 National Stereoscopic Assn. convention Huron OH Susan Pinsky
and Vivian Walworth by David Starkman
1997 Boston Reuben Hoppenstein, David St
1997 Boston MA Reuben Hoppenstein, David Starkman, Susan Pinsky and
Vivian Walworth at breakfast 24 May by David Burder
2008_NSA_Grand_Rapids_MI_July_by_Susan_P
2008 Jan Burandt and Vivian Walworth at National Stereoscopic Assn convention
Grand Rapids MI July by Susan Pinsky
1992 Susan Pinsky, Sam Kitrosser, David
2009 Vivian Walworth and Jan Burandt in
2009 Jan Burandt and Vivian Walworth at National Stereoscopic Assn convention
Mesa AZ July by Susan Pinsky

She then found a research lab job at a small photographic company, Defender, which later became part of DuPont. During Vivian's time at Defender, the company had two pay scales: one for men and one for women. At one point, Vivian found out that she was being paid a lower salary than the male dishwasher was paid. She promptly "went and made a complaint," until the salary discrepancy was corrected.

2009 NSA Mesa AZ July by David Starkman_
2009 Sue Berry, Vivian Walworth and Dick Koolish at National Stereoscopic Assn convention
in Mesa AZ July by Susan Pinsky
2008_NSA_Grand_Rapids_MI_July_by_Susan_P
2008 Jan Burandt and Vivian Walworth at National Stereoscopic Assn convention
in Grand Rapids MI July by Susan Pinsky

During the following year Wilbur completed an evening course in what was then called Ultrahigh Frequency Techniques, offered by the War Manpower Training Commission ("radar" then being a classified term). He then accepted a position as Radar Field Engineer with
Submarine Signal Company in Boston and was soon assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Vivian worked for a year in a University of Pennsylvania biochemistry research lab engaged in an Air Force-sponsored study of brain metabolism at reduced oxygen levels

1992 Susan Pinsky, Sam Kitrosser, David Burder, Paul Wing, Dottie
and Vivian Walworth by David Starkman
2012 Vivian Walworth, Terry Wilson, Hide
2012 Vivian Walworth, Terry Wilson, Hideki Kakeya by Andrew Woods
2009 Participants in Wednesday's lunch-t

In 1944, Vivian and her husband moved back to the Boston area, where Vivian obtained a job at Polaroid. Vivian's initial position was in Vectograph Research. The Vectograph process provided black-and-white three-dimensional polarized images that could be produced rapidly in the field, and these images were used extensively throughout World War II in support of aerial surveillance. Polaroid operated a school to train military technicians and supplied field kits that enabled them to produce stereoscopic images rapidly in the field for use in pilot briefing sessions. Within the Vectograph Research Laboratory, Vivian worked on a pilot training film that provided polarized target circles that could be displayed during training and turned off for pilot testing. She also participated in research on color Vectograph processes.

2002 Susan Pinsky Vectograph collection
2002 Susan Pinsky Vectograph collection at home with 1945 color vectographs made by Vivian Walworth in Nov
by Susan Pinsky 
2012 American Chemical Society appreciat

   Vivian Walworth 

      -  A Scientist,   

          an Inventor,

      a remarkable   

            person

2002 Visiting Vivian Walworth in Concord
2002 Visiting Vivian Walworth and her dog in Concord MA by Susan Pinsky
2002 Vivian Walworth in platinum blonde wig with Jon Golden at Jan Burandt's birthday party
13 Jan by Susan Pinsky.
1946 Vectograph of Man with horses on display at exhibit in Nov 2002 at Museum of Jurasic Technology
by Susan Pinsky
1945 Vectograph from Susan Pinsky-David
1945 Vectograph from Susan Pinsky-David Starkman 2002 exhibit at Museum of Jurassic Technology by Susan Pinsky
2003 Polarized print vectograms on exhib
2003 Polarized print vectographs on exhibit at Museum of Jurassic Technology by David Starkman
2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at
2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _03
2005 ISU Eastbourne UK Susan Pinsky and
2005 International Stereoscopic Union congress in Eastbourne UK with Susan Pinsky and Vivian Walworth
by David Starkman
2002 1944 color vectograph of woman watc
1945 Color Vectograph made by Vivian Walworth of an elegant woman next to her radio
vectograph booklet 11.jpg
1985%2520Vivian%2520Walworth%2520good%25
2009 Participants in Wednesday's lunch-time round-table discussion
by Andrew Woods 

When Dr. Edwin Land introduced Polaroid one-step photography in 1947, Polaroid was relying on negative produced by Kodak and DuPont.   The Vectograph group, including Vivian, undertook fabrication of Polaroid photographic emulsions. Throughout that time, Polaroid was "a very exciting place to be," said Vivian. For several years she served as Manager of both the Emulsion Research Laboratory and the Research Microscopy Laboratory. When she left Polaroid in 1985 she was Senior Manager of Photosensitive Materials Research.

Along with her research work at Polaroid, Vivian had the opportunity to co-author a chapter with Dr. Land on one-step photography, She also wrote several encyclopedia articles on the subject. Overall, Vivian authored and co-authored 28 patents and numerous publications based on Polaroid research

For many of her years at Polaroid Vivian was active in the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T). She served as its president from 1981-1985, as editor of its Journal of Imaging Science (1989-91) and the successor Journal of Imaging Science and Technology (1992-1996). She also founded IS&T's bimonthly newsletter, the IS&T Reporter, and edited it for 22 years.

Vivian Walworth portrait with microscope
Vivian Walworth with her microscope
Vivian Walworth portrait.jpg
Vivian Walworth
Dr. Myron Simon, founding member of the
2013 Dr. Myron Simon, founding member of the Esselen Award Committee, and Vivian Walworth  at the Awards dinner of the NE Section of the American Chemical Society

Vivian joined the American Chemical Society in January, 1942, and has been a member of NESACS since 1944. . She was recruited for the Board of Publications in 2005 by Nucleus Editor Arno Heyn, whom she had known well since their days together at the University of Michigan.

During her tenure on the Board of Publications, Vivian successfully recruited Michael Filosa to serve as the editor of "The Nucleus," a job that he has held for 7 years. "We are very lucky to have Mike," Vivian said. "The Nucleus is considered the leading ACS Section publication."

The future of "The Nucleus" and the Board of Publications is likely to involve a steady increase in the importance of the website, which had just started to develop during the end of Arno Heyn's tenure. "I wouldn't be surprised if we stopped printing The Nucleus on paper within the next five years," said Vivian. "The website access is so much more timely."
Polaroid eventually filed for bankruptcy in 2001. Many of the former Polaroid scientists have stayed in the Boston area and are "doing wonderful things," said Vivian. As an example, all members of the staff of StereoJet, Inc., Vivian's start-up company, are former Polaroid employees.

The R&D being conducted at StereoJet, Inc. is an outgrowth of Polaroid research on color Vectographs. When inkjet printing was introduced in the 1980s, Vivian realized that the technology could be used to generate three-dimensional color images. Preliminary work at Polaroid indicated that this idea was feasible. Vivian worked for several years as consultant to a group at the Rowland Institute for Science led by another former Polaroid employee, Jay Scarpetti, to develop and patent the first StereoJet process. This work was discontinued when the Rowland Institute merged with Harvard University in 2002. Vivian and others tried for some time to help Harvard license the process. Finally, "a group of Polaroid 'alumni' decided that we should be the ones to do it," said Vivian, "and here we are."

StereoJet, Inc. Corporation is currently self- funded. However, Vivian indicated that she does not find the financial situation unnerving. "In five years from now, we will either be dead or thriving," said Vivian, but she is personally confident that the company will be successful. "No one is doing anything like this," Vivian said. "I think we are going to make it."
                           Interview by Mindy Levine Ph.D.

1988 Presidents Citiation to Vivian Walw
2003 Vectogram book on display for eye training at Museum of Jurassic Technology in Culver City CA with other vectographs to display polarized prints by Susan Pinsky

Vivian Walworth, 1922-2016

Vivian, born in Detroit, Michigan, January 12, 1922, was the daughter of Sydney and Estelle Kann. She graduated from Cass Technical High School in 1938 and received a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1942. In 1941 she married fellow student Wilbur Walworth following his graduation from the U. of M. School of Engineering.

The couple moved to Cambridge in 1943, when Wilbur was recruited by Submarine Signal Company as a field engineer for shipboard radar. Vivian joined Polaroid's Vectograph Research Department and became engaged in 3D imaging for support of aerial reconnaissance and pilot training. Until shortly after WW 2 the couple devoted their energy to work that supported the war effort. 

The two then decided to try to balance parenting and professional careers. They raised five children, were active in the community, and also served for many years as Scout leaders. From 1955 to 1970 Vivian was co-leader of the Concord Mariners, a senior Girl Scout troop that featured sailing, seamanship, and canoeing, along with community service.

2002 Vivian Walwolth and socks by Susan
2002 Vivian Walworth enjoying a gift from her daughter January by Susan Pinsky

Vivian was a member of the Boston Mycological Club from the early 1950s. She was proud that all of her children participated and became well-informed mushroom collectors. She also took pride in their talents and careers.

Vivian was a member of the Polaroid Research Division from 1944 to 1985, when she retired as Senior Research Manager for Photosensitive Materials. Her work at Polaroid included research and development of polarizers, 3D imaging processes, photosensitive materials, and photomicrography. Her 28 patents reflect her contributions in these fields. 
 

Vivian Walworth looking content.jpg
2012 Vivian Walworth at a convention
Titmus Stereo Tests. House Fly. Polaroid
Titmus Stereo Tests. House Fly.
Polaroid 3-D Vectograph.
2006 Vivian Walworth with friend and cousin Paul Erlich at Stereo Club of So Calif. by Susan Pinsky

For 16 years Vivian was a member of HILR — Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement. She presented courses on Captain Cook, Polynesia, Chemistry, Kitchen Chemistry, History of Photography, and Mushroom Collecting. She left HILR to return to work in 2009 when she, Dennis Slafer, and Diane Martin formed StereoJet, Inc., in Cambridge, to produce a simplified version of StereoJet using circular polarization, as well as other polarized light products.

Imaging Processes and Materials Neblette
2012 Vivian Walworth and Ray Zone by And
Imaging Processes and Materials Neblettes by John M. Sturge, Vivian Walworth and Allan Shepp
2012 Vivian Walworth and Ray Zone by Andrew Woods

Vivian's Polaroid publications include papers and articles on dye sensitization, diffusion transfer processes, image stability, arrayed grain technology, microscopy, stereoscopy, and polarizers. She was co-author with Edwin Land and Howard Rogers of "One-Step Photography" in the seventh edition of Neblette's Handbook of Photography and Reprography, and co-editor of Imaging Processes and Materials, Neblette's 8th Edition. She wrote and co-authored sections on instant photography for three editions of the Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology and for the SPSE Handbook of Photographic Science and Engineering. 

A long-time member of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Vivian served for several years on the publication board of its Northeastern Section (NESACS). Vivian was an active member of IS&T, the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (formerly the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers). She served as president of that society from 1981 through 1985. She edited the Journal of Imaging Science (JIS) and the successor Journal of Imaging Science and Technology (JIST) from 1989 through 1996, and for many years edited the bimonthly IS&T newsletter. In annual Electronic Imaging symposia she served for several years on the committee for the conference Stereo Displays and Applications. There she presented a series of papers on StereoJet technology, as well as a Keynote Address on the development of sheet polarizers and their broad utilization.

Vivian worked closely with Dr. Land for several years and was instrumental in having his office and the laboratory where he invented instant photography at 2 Osborne St, Cambridge, MA, designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark by the American Chemical Society. Vivian prepared the nomination and participated in the celebration at MIT Museum in August 2015.

Following her retirement from Polaroid in 1985 Vivian founded Jasper Associates and worked as a consultant in several aspects of imaging. From 1984 through 1992 she served as a consultant at the Rowland Institute for Science, participating in the development of the first StereoJet stereoscopic hardcopy process. 
 

SPIE committee with Vivian Walworth.jpg
2006 SPIE with Vivian Walworth, John Merritt
and Andrew Woods by Steven L. Smith
2002 Everyone wearing Jan Burandt's birthday present
Jean Harlow blonde bombshell wig except the dogs
at Jon Golden's house in MA
2002 Dec David Starkman viewing Vectograph exhibit at Museum of Jurassic Technology by Susan Pinsky
2003 Polarized print vectographs on exhi
2003 Polarized print vectographs on exhibit at Museum of Jurassic Technology with Susan Pinsky by David Starkman

In 1985 Vivian became active in REUSIT, the volunteer group that at that time conducted the only recycling projects in Concord. After the town undertook limited recycling in 1989, Vivian, then president of REUSIT, initiated recycling of cardboard and plastics not yet covered by the town program. She later served on the task force that recommended closure of the landfill and on the subsequent advisory board that facilitated the transition to curbside collection. She also organized a small SwapOff, which was the starting point for Concord's popular DropOff/SwapOff events.

Vivian was an active member of the First Parish (Unitarian) in Concord, MA. She passed away March 29 after a slow decline due to atrial stenosis. She is survived by her children Janis, Alan, Roger, Jim, and Irene Walworth and their families, including four grandchildren and six step-grandchildren.

2002 Vivian Walworth by Susan Pinsky .jp
2002 Vivian Walworth in Concord, MA
by Susan Pinsky
2013 NESACS Meeting (Esselen Award) Rose
2013 NESACS Meeting (Esselen Award) Rose Simon, Sophia Su and Vivian Walworth

Remembering 

Vivian K.  Walworth: Photographic Scientist, Researcher, and Inspiration

2009 San Jose SDA Vivian Walworth and Ro
2009 San Jose, CA Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference with Vivian Walworth and Ron Labbe
 by Abe Perlstein

I lost another close friend just over a month after Al Weber passed away. Vivian Walworth passed away at age 94 on March 29, 2016. Like Al Weber, I first met Vivian Walworth at an Ansel's workshop, but a few years later. I was an assistant at the Yosemite workshops, and Vivian was attending as part of Ansel's close relationship with Polaroid Corporation. At that time Vivian was the Senior Research Manager at Polaroid, and a long-time friend of Ansel and Virginia. Upon first meeting Vivian, I was impressed with her enthusiasm, energy, and encyclopaedic knowledge of photography.

2013 SDandA San Francisco Susan Pinsky,
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco - Susan Pinsky, Terry Wilson and Vivian Walworth Feb by David Starkman
2013_SDandA_San_Francisco_Feb_by_David_S
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco -
Vivian Walworth at her exhibit table - Feb by David Starkman

by John Sexton

2002 Vivian Walworth, at home in Concord, MA
by Susan Pinsky
2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at
2002 Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _10

We kept in touch following that first encounter, and remained friends over the decades. When I left Ansel's full time employment in late 1982 he was kind enough to write letters of recommendation to both Polaroid Corporation and Eastman Kodak Company, encouraging them to hire me as a photographic consultant. Much to my surprise, Eastman Kodak Company acted upon Ansel's recommendation first. Shortly thereafter I received an invitation from Polaroid Corporation. Unfortunately they had concerns as I was already a consultant for Kodak. You might recall the monumental litigation between Polaroid and Kodak over the instant photography process. Had it not been for Vivian's intervention, where she stated, "We have physicists that consult for both Polaroid and Kodak, why can't we have a photographer?" I don't believe my consulting position would have ever materialized at Polaroid. I was fortunate to serve as a consultant to both companies – thanks to Vivian's dedication and belief in me as a photographer and my photographic knowledge.

2013 SDandA San Francisco Feb Vivian Wal
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco -
Vivian Walworth at her exhibit table - Feb by David Starkman
2013 SDandA San Francisco Feb by David S
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco -
Vivian Walworth at her exhibit table - Feb by David Starkman

Over the years we would see one another, either in Cambridge, Massachusetts or on the Monterey Peninsula. Without exception, I learned something surprising from Vivian whenever we communicated. More importantly I was inspired by her own eagerness to enthusiasm to learn and discover - seemingly about everything!

2013_SDandA_San_Francisco_Feb_by_David_S
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco -
Vivian Walworth at her exhibit table - Feb by David Starkman
2013 SDandA San Francisco Feb by David S
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco -
Vivian Walworth, Susan Pinsky, Terry Wilson, Lenny Lipton and Eric Kurland - Feb by David Starkman
2013 David Starkman, Terry Wilson and Vi
2013 Stereoscopic Displays and Applications conference in San Francisco - David Starkman,
Susan Pinsky, Terry Wilson and Vivian Walworth in Feb  
2005 Vivian Walworth and group shot of 3
2005 Vivian Walworth at left, and group shot of 3D photogs at Internation Stereo Congress
Eastbourne UK Sept by Susan Pinsky

Had it not been for Vivian I would never have had the opportunity to meet Dr. Edwin H. Land, the inventor of the Polaroid Land instant photography process. Vivian worked closely with Dr. Land from 1944 until she retired from Polaroid in 1985. However, just because she retired did not mean her work was done! She continued as a consultant, and In 2009, at the age of 87 years young, she and others from Polaroid founded StereoJet Incorporated, where she served as the President and CTO. As you can tell, Vivian certainly did not believe in "retirement" in the traditional sense of the word!

2005_Vivian_Walworth_with_friends_at_Pub
2005 Bob Aldridge, Vivian Walworth, Rich Dubnow and friends at a pub near Brighton
in Sept by Susan Pinsky
2007 Watts Towers with Irv Pinsky, Madel
2007 glorious Watts Towers in Los Angeles with Irv Pinsky, Madelyn Erlich, David Starkman
and Vivian Walworth in Feb by Irv's daughter Susan Pinsky

She was a scientist, inventor, scholar, author, editor, Senior Manager at Polaroid, role model, hiker, expert mycologist, and community leader in Girl Scouts and conservation programs in her town. At the same time she was a wife, mother, grandmother.

I am fortunate to have had a long friendship with Vivian, and there are no words that can express my gratitude for her support of my photographic endeavors. We had our last conversation a few weeks before she passed away. She was as "sharp as a tack," and was talking about future possible activities, though at the same time realizing there were health issues that might not allow those to happen. Sadly, such was the case. I, her loving and caring family, will miss her greatly. I would encourage you to do a web search on Vivian K. Walworth. I know you will find references to an unique and amazing person who blazed a trail in the scientific world during an era when men dominated the field. All of us that are photographers use technology, at the molecular level, that she helped to pioneer. More importantly, her heart was filled with compassion, excitement, and an amazing love for life.

Special thanks to Mary and John McCann, longtime friends and colleagues of Vivian, at Polaroid Corporation for their contributions to this text.

39 pink rose XGA2.jpg
Pink Rose Stereojet of an X-ray done by Albert Richards

Vivian Walworth - Various Sources

2003 Vivian Walworth and David Wilson at
Museum of Jurassic Technology looking at 
Albert Richards floral polarized Stereojets

It is with sadness that we note the recent passing of Vivian Walworth, 3D pioneer at age 93. While working at Polaroid and later with the Rowland Institute (which she was co-founder) Vivian was essential in the development of circular polarized 3D, the vectograph, and instant print film. Vivian was also a regular fixture at our NSA conventions and the Stereoscopic Displays Conference in the last few years and was a giving 3d enthusiast and mentor along with being a premier scientist. 


Born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1922 Vivian received a BS in Chemistry from University of Michigan in 1942. She married fellow student Wilbur Walworth and moved to Cambridge in 1943, where Vivian joined Polaroid, working on 3D imaging for aerial reconnaissance during the War. 


Vivian worked closely with Edwin Land and was instrumental in having the laboratory where he invented instant photography designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark in 2015. She was a member of the Boston Mycological Club from the early 1950s. After her retirement in 1985, Vivian served as a consultant at Rowland Institute for Science, and in 2009 she co-founded StereoJet, Inc., which uses innovative technology similar to vectographs to produce high-quality 3D images. 


Vivian taught courses at Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement from 1992 to 2008. She was an active member of First Parish in Concord. She traveled extensively to locales as far as Fiji. Vivian died March 29 after a slow decline due to atrial stenosis. She is survived by her 5 children, 4 grandchildren and 6 step- grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on June 18 at First Parish in Concord. 

Janaka Rajapakse - VFX ASIA

"R.I.P Vivian Walworth

It is with great sadness that I write to let you all know that Vivian Walworth passed away last week at the age of 94. 

Vivian had a wonderfully accomplished career. If you've ever seen a RealD 3D movie, you have Vivian to thank for the development of circularly polarized 3D glasses. If you've ever used a Polaroid instant film camera, you have Vivian to thank for her part in developing and refining Polaroid instant film. Vivian also worked on the Vectograph polarized 3D print technique which evolved to the StereoJet polarized 3D inkjet print technique."

2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at
2002 Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _01
2002 Vectograph collection of Susan's 6 Nov
by Susan Pinsky_39

Harvard Oasis Library

Subseries IK.        Vivian Walworth records, 1941-1985


Historical Note: Vivian Walworth began her career in the vectograph research department at Polaroid in 1944. She worked on black and white three dimensional imaging, stereoscopic imaging and the color vectograph process. After the introduction of one-step instant photography, Walworth conducted research on photographic emulsions. She later became manager of the Emulsion Research Laboratory and the Research Microscopy Laboratory. Before she left Polaroid in 1985, she was the Senior Manager of Photosensitive Materials Research. With Dr. Edwin Land, Walworth co-authored a chapter on one-step instant photography, filed 28 patents and served as president of the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers from 1981-1985.
Scope and Content: Vivian Walworth's records consist of memorandum files, correspondence, subject files, research files and records pertaining to her tenure as president of the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers. The records date from 1941 to 1985. The memorandum files primarily consists of documents relating to scientific research, including lab and experiment reports, scientific data and diagrams, case histories and research papers for publication, lab equipment and materials. Much of Walworth's research was dedicated to the improvement of one-step instant photography, the SX-70 camera and Project Sesame.
Related Material: For additional material related to vectograph research and three-dimensional movie records, see Three-dimensional research and Willian H. Ryan's records.

(left to right) John Merritt, Gregg Fava
(left to right) John Merritt, Gregg Favalora, Neil Dodgson, Vivian Walworth, etc
1985 Vivian Walworth Polaroid Corp 40 ye

John Merritt

 

Dear friends of Vivian,

We have lost another primary pillar of our stereoscopic community, and we shall miss her deeply. It was with profound sadness that I learned of her passing, and memories of those decades when she was with us year after year passed in review. She set such an extraordinary example, with her long scientific career, her memberships in imaging-related professional societies, her adventurous trips to far-flung places such as Fiji, her generous mentoring of us in our shared passion for the advancement of 3D display technologies, all while also living a full family life with her husband and children. Even as she progressed into her later years, she maintained the acumen and vitality to travel year after year to our annual 3D conference in California, chairing paper sessions and presenting papers despite challenges to her health.

John Merritt CONTINUED: At Polaroid, where she worked with our dearly departed 3D colleague Steve Benton, she was instrumental in the development of circularly polarized 3D glasses, which are now the standard in 3D cinema projection. Our community will long remember her and miss her familiar presence at our gatherings. 

With love and respect, John
 

2011 SD&A committee and chairs Nick Holl
2009%20Vivian%20Walworth%20(Jasper%20Ass
2009 Vivian Walworth (Jasper Associates) introduces Perry Hoberman (University of Southern California)
2002 Dec Edwin H Land Vectograph Process
2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at
2002 Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _05
2002 Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _06
2011 SD&A committee and chairs Nick Holliman, Takashi Kawai, John Stern, Andrew Woods, Gregg Favalora,
John Merritt, Vivian Walworth, Neil Dodgson, Hideki Kakeya,
Mike Weissman, Chris Ward
2006 Vivian Walworth with Paul and Madel
2006 Vivian Walworth with cousins Paul and Madelyn Erlich and Stereo Club of So Calif members at Jan meeting by Susan Pinsky
2005 ISU Eastbourne UK Rich Dubnow, Vivi
2005 ISU Eastbourne UK Rich Dubnow, Vivian Walworth and Jon Golden by Susan Pinsky
2012 Vivian Walworth calendar created by
2010 July Dwight Cummings with Vivian Wa
2010 July Dwight Cummings with Vivian Walworth at National Stereoscopic Asssn convention looking at Stereojets and Vectographs at Huron OH by David Starkman
2010 NSA Huron OH Suzanne and Steve Hugh

Vivian had a wonderfully accomplished career. If you've ever seen a 
RealD 3D movie, you have Vivian to thank for the development of 
circularly polarized 3D glasses. If you've ever used a Polaroid instant 
film camera, you have Vivian to thank for her part in developing and 
refining Polaroid instant film. Vivian also worked on the Vectograph 
polarized 3D print technique which evolved to the StereoJet polarized 3D inkjet print technique.

2010 NSA Huron OH Suzanne and Steve Hughes at July  with Vivian Walworth by Susan Pinsky

-  John Merritt

Albert_Richards_1990_Xray019.jpg
Stereojet of a flower X-ray done by Albert Richards- 2
2013 San Francisco Society for Display a
2013 San Francisco Society for Display and Applications Vivian Walworth's exhibit showing polarized full color Stereojet prints, front and back-lit, 14 Apr by Susan Pinsky
2013 San Francisco Vivian Walworth showi
 2013 Society of Display and Applications Stereojets and Vivian Walworth by Susan Pinsky
2013 San Francisco Vivian Walworth showi
 2013 Society of Display and Applications Vivian Walworth on left David Starkman on right
by Susan Pinsky
2013 Andrew Woods, another speaker and V
2013 Andrew Woods, another speaker and Vivian Walworth at Stereo Displays & Applications in Feb
in San Francisco by David Starkman
Vivian Walworth records, 1941-1985

Historical Note: Vivian Walworth began her career in the vectograph research department at Polaroid in 1944. She worked on black and white three dimensional imaging, stereoscopic imaging and the color vectograph process. After the introduction of one-step instant photo-graphy, Walworth conducted research on photographic emulsions. She later became manager of the Emulsion Research Laboratory and the Research Microscopy Laboratory. Before she left Polaroid in 1985, she was the Senior Manager of Photosensitive Materials Research. With Dr. Edwin Land, Walworth co-authored a chapter on one-step instant photography, filed 28 patents and served as president of the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers from 1981-1985.
Scope and Content: Vivian Walworth's records consist of memorandum files, correspondence, subject files, research files and records pertaining to her tenure as president of the Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers. The records date from 1941 to 1985. The memorandum files primarily consists of documents relating to scientific research, including lab and experiment reports, scientific data and diagrams, case histories and research papers for publication, lab equipment and materials. Much of Walworth's research was dedicated to the improvement of one-step instant photography, the SX-70 camera and Project Sesame.
Related Material: For additional material related to vectograph research and three-dimensional movie records, see Three-dimensional research and Willian H. Ryan's records.
- - Harvard Oasis Library

Albert_Richards_1990_Xray023.jpg
Stereojet of a flower X-ray done by Albert Richards- 3
Albert_Richards_1990_Xray005.jpg
Albert_Richards_1990_Xray003.jpg
Stereojet of a flower X-ray done by Albert Richards- 4
Stereojet of a flower X-ray done by Albert Richards- 5
2008 SD&A clockwise from front left- Viv
2002 Nov Pinsky Vectograph collection at
2002 Pinsky Vectograph collection at home by Susan Pinsky _18
2003 Vectograph exhibit at Mus of Jurass
2002 Vivian Walworth enjoying a gift from her daughter January by Susan Pinsky in Los Angeles, CA
2008 Science Displays and Applications conference meal clockwise from front left- Vivian Walworth -Jasper Associates, Terry Wilson, Ianir Ideses-Tel-Aviv Univ, Michael Klug-Zebra Imaging,
Toshio Honda-Chiba Univ, Japan by Andrew Woods
Please Note - all photos will enlarge bo
xoxoxooxxo
This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now